Np mrd loader

You are using an unsupported browser. Please upgrade your browser to a newer version to get the best experience on NP-MRD.
Record Information
Version1.0
Created at2009-03-03 12:04:46 UTC
Updated at2021-10-07 20:41:37 UTC
NP-MRD IDNP0001169
Secondary Accession NumbersNone
Natural Product Identification
Common NameN-Acetyl-L-methionine
DescriptionN-Acetyl-L-methionine or N-Acetylmethionine, belongs to the class of organic compounds known as N-acyl-alpha amino acids. N-acyl-alpha amino acids are compounds containing an alpha amino acid which bears an acyl group at its terminal nitrogen atom. N-Acetylmethionine can also be classified as an alpha amino acid or a derivatized alpha amino acid. Technically, N-Acetylmethionine is a biologically available N-terminal capped form of the proteinogenic alpha amino acid L-methionine. N-acetyl amino acids can be produced either via direct synthesis of specific N-acetyltransferases or via the proteolytic degradation of N-acetylated proteins by specific hydrolases. N-terminal acetylation of proteins is a widespread and highly conserved process in eukaryotes that is involved in protection and stability of proteins (PMID: 16465618 ). About 85% of all human proteins and 68% of all yeast proteins are acetylated at their N-terminus (PMID: 21750686 ). Several proteins from prokaryotes and archaea are also modified by N-terminal acetylation. The majority of eukaryotic N-terminal-acetylation reactions occur through N-acetyltransferase enzymes or NAT’s (PMID: 30054468 ). These enzymes consist of three main oligomeric complexes NatA, NatB, and NatC, which are composed of at least a unique catalytic subunit and one unique ribosomal anchor. The substrate specificities of different NAT enzymes are mainly determined by the identities of the first two N-terminal residues of the target protein. The human NatA complex co-translationally acetylates N-termini that bear a small amino acid (A, S, T, C, and occasionally V and G) (PMID: 30054468 ). NatA also exists in a monomeric state and can post-translationally acetylate acidic N-termini residues (D-, E-). NatB and NatC acetylate N-terminal methionine with further specificity determined by the identity of the second amino acid. N-acetylated amino acids, such as N-acetylmethionine can be released by an N-acylpeptide hydrolase from peptides generated by proteolytic degradation (PMID: 16465618 ). In addition to the NAT enzymes and protein-based acetylation, N-acetylation of free methionine can also occur. In particular, N-Acetylmethionine can be biosynthesized from L-methionine and acetyl-CoA by the enzyme methionine N-acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.66). Excessive amounts N-acetyl amino acids including N-acetylmethionine (as well as N-acetylglycine, N-acetylserine, N-acetylglutamine, N-acetylglutamate, N-acetylalanine, N-acetylleucine and smaller amounts of N-acetylthreonine, N-acetylisoleucine, and N-acetylvaline) can be detected in the urine with individuals with acylase I deficiency, a genetic disorder (PMID: 16465618 ). Aminoacylase I is a soluble homodimeric zinc binding enzyme that catalyzes the formation of free aliphatic amino acids from N-acetylated precursors. In humans, Aminoacylase I is encoded by the aminoacylase 1 gene (ACY1) on chromosome 3p21 that consists of 15 exons (OMIM 609924 ). Individuals with aminoacylase I deficiency will experience convulsions, hearing loss and difficulty feeding (PMID: 16465618 ). ACY1 can also catalyze the reverse reaction, the synthesis of acetylated amino acids. Many N-acetylamino acids, including N-acetylmethionine are classified as uremic toxins if present in high abundance in the serum or plasma (PMID: 26317986 ; PMID: 20613759 ). Uremic toxins are a diverse group of endogenously produced molecules that, if not properly cleared or eliminated by the kidneys, can cause kidney damage, cardiovascular disease and neurological deficits (PMID: 18287557 ).
Structure
Thumb
Synonyms
ValueSource
(2S)-2-Acetamido-4-(methylsulfanyl)butanoic acidChEBI
Acetyl-L-methionineChEBI
AcetylmethionineChEBI
AcMetChEBI
L-(N-Acetyl)methionineChEBI
MethionamineChEBI
N-Ac-metChEBI
N-AcetylmethionineChEBI
Nalpha-acetyl-L-methionineChEBI
(2S)-2-Acetamido-4-(methylsulfanyl)butanoateGenerator
(2S)-2-Acetamido-4-(methylsulphanyl)butanoateGenerator
(2S)-2-Acetamido-4-(methylsulphanyl)butanoic acidGenerator
N-Ac-L-methionineHMDB
N-Acetyl-methionineHMDB
N-Acetylmethionine monopotassium saltHMDB
N-Acetylmethionine monosodium saltHMDB
HepsanHMDB
N-Acetylmethionine, (D)-isomerHMDB
N-Acetylmethionine, (DL)-isomerHMDB
(2S)-2-Acetamido-4-methylsulfanylbutanoic acidHMDB
(S)-2-Acetamido-4-(methylthio)butanoic acidHMDB
MethioninHMDB
N-Acetyl-L-methionineKEGG
Chemical FormulaC7H13NO3S
Average Mass191.2480 Da
Monoisotopic Mass191.06161 Da
IUPAC Name(2S)-2-acetamido-4-(methylsulfanyl)butanoic acid
Traditional NameN-acetylmethionine
CAS Registry Number65-82-7
SMILES
CSCCC(NC(C)=O)C(O)=O
InChI Identifier
InChI=1S/C7H13NO3S/c1-5(9)8-6(7(10)11)3-4-12-2/h6H,3-4H2,1-2H3,(H,8,9)(H,10,11)
InChI KeyXUYPXLNMDZIRQH-UHFFFAOYSA-N
Spectra
Spectrum TypeDescriptionDepositor IDDeposition DateView
1D NMR13C NMR Spectrum (1D, 25 MHz, D2O, predicted)Wishart Lab2021-06-20View Spectrum
1D NMR1H NMR Spectrum (1D, 100 MHz, D2O, predicted)Wishart Lab2021-06-20View Spectrum
1D NMR1H NMR Spectrum (1D, 1000 MHz, D2O, predicted)Wishart Lab2021-06-20View Spectrum
1D NMR13C NMR Spectrum (1D, 252 MHz, D2O, predicted)Wishart Lab2021-06-20View Spectrum
1D NMR1H NMR Spectrum (1D, 200 MHz, D2O, predicted)Wishart Lab2021-06-20View Spectrum
1D NMR13C NMR Spectrum (1D, 50 MHz, D2O, predicted)Wishart Lab2021-06-20View Spectrum
1D NMR13C NMR Spectrum (1D, 75 MHz, D2O, predicted)Wishart Lab2021-06-20View Spectrum
1D NMR1H NMR Spectrum (1D, 300 MHz, D2O, predicted)Wishart Lab2021-06-20View Spectrum
1D NMR1H NMR Spectrum (1D, 400 MHz, D2O, predicted)Wishart Lab2021-06-20View Spectrum
1D NMR13C NMR Spectrum (1D, 101 MHz, D2O, predicted)Wishart Lab2021-06-20View Spectrum
1D NMR1H NMR Spectrum (1D, 500 MHz, D2O, predicted)Wishart Lab2021-06-20View Spectrum
1D NMR13C NMR Spectrum (1D, 126 MHz, D2O, predicted)Wishart Lab2021-06-20View Spectrum
1D NMR1H NMR Spectrum (1D, 600 MHz, D2O, predicted)Wishart Lab2021-06-20View Spectrum
1D NMR13C NMR Spectrum (1D, 151 MHz, D2O, predicted)Wishart Lab2021-06-20View Spectrum
1D NMR13C NMR Spectrum (1D, 176 MHz, D2O, predicted)Wishart Lab2021-06-20View Spectrum
1D NMR1H NMR Spectrum (1D, 700 MHz, D2O, predicted)Wishart Lab2021-06-20View Spectrum
1D NMR1H NMR Spectrum (1D, 800 MHz, D2O, predicted)Wishart Lab2021-06-20View Spectrum
1D NMR13C NMR Spectrum (1D, 201 MHz, D2O, predicted)Wishart Lab2021-06-20View Spectrum
1D NMR13C NMR Spectrum (1D, 226 MHz, D2O, predicted)Wishart Lab2021-06-20View Spectrum
1D NMR1H NMR Spectrum (1D, 900 MHz, D2O, predicted)Wishart Lab2021-06-20View Spectrum
Species
Species of Origin
Species NameSourceReference
Anas platyrhynchos
Anatidae
Anser anser
Arabidopsis thalianaLOTUS Database
Bison bison
Bos taurus
Bos taurus X Bison bison
Bubalus bubalis
Capra aegagrus hircus
Cervidae
Cervus canadensis
Columba
Columbidae
Dromaius novaehollandiae
Equus caballus
Gallus gallus
Lagopus muta
Leporidae
Lepus timidus
Melanitta fusca
Meleagris gallopavo
Numida meleagris
Odocoileus
Oryctolagus
Ovis aries
Phasianidae
Phasianus colchicus
Struthio camelus
Sus scrofa
Sus scrofa domestica
Trypanosoma bruceiLOTUS Database
Chemical Taxonomy
Description Belongs to the class of organic compounds known as methionine and derivatives. Methionine and derivatives are compounds containing methionine or a derivative thereof resulting from reaction of methionine at the amino group or the carboxy group, or from the replacement of any hydrogen of glycine by a heteroatom.
KingdomOrganic compounds
Super ClassOrganic acids and derivatives
ClassCarboxylic acids and derivatives
Sub ClassAmino acids, peptides, and analogues
Direct ParentMethionine and derivatives
Alternative Parents
Substituents
  • Methionine or derivatives
  • N-acyl-alpha-amino acid
  • N-acyl-alpha amino acid or derivatives
  • N-acyl-l-alpha-amino acid
  • Thia fatty acid
  • Fatty acid
  • Fatty acyl
  • Acetamide
  • Secondary carboxylic acid amide
  • Carboxamide group
  • Dialkylthioether
  • Sulfenyl compound
  • Thioether
  • Monocarboxylic acid or derivatives
  • Carboxylic acid
  • Hydrocarbon derivative
  • Organic oxygen compound
  • Organosulfur compound
  • Organooxygen compound
  • Organonitrogen compound
  • Carbonyl group
  • Organic oxide
  • Organopnictogen compound
  • Organic nitrogen compound
  • Aliphatic acyclic compound
Molecular FrameworkAliphatic acyclic compounds
External Descriptors
Physical Properties
StateSolid
Experimental Properties
PropertyValueReference
Melting Point105.5 °CNot Available
Boiling Point453.60 °C. @ 760.00 mm Hg (est)The Good Scents Company Information System
Water Solubility307 at 25 °CNot Available
LogP-0.03Meylan, W. M., & Howard, P. H. (1995). Atom/fragment contribution method for estimating octanol-water partition coefficients. Journal of pharmaceutical sciences, 84(1), 83-92.
Predicted Properties
PropertyValueSource
Water Solubility6.84 g/LALOGPS
logP-0.15ALOGPS
logP-0.11ChemAxon
logS-1.4ALOGPS
pKa (Strongest Acidic)4.02ChemAxon
pKa (Strongest Basic)-1.8ChemAxon
Physiological Charge-1ChemAxon
Hydrogen Acceptor Count3ChemAxon
Hydrogen Donor Count2ChemAxon
Polar Surface Area66.4 ŲChemAxon
Rotatable Bond Count5ChemAxon
Refractivity47.03 m³·mol⁻¹ChemAxon
Polarizability19.59 ųChemAxon
Number of Rings0ChemAxon
BioavailabilityYesChemAxon
Rule of FiveYesChemAxon
Ghose FilterYesChemAxon
Veber's RuleNoChemAxon
MDDR-like RuleNoChemAxon
HMDB IDHMDB0011745
DrugBank IDDB01646
Phenol Explorer Compound IDNot Available
FoodDB IDFDB001089
KNApSAcK IDNot Available
Chemspider ID395338
KEGG Compound IDC02712
BioCyc IDCPD0-2015
BiGG IDNot Available
Wikipedia LinkNot Available
METLIN IDNot Available
PubChem Compound448580
PDB IDNot Available
ChEBI ID21557
Good Scents IDrw1265521
References
General References
  1. Sass JO, Mohr V, Olbrich H, Engelke U, Horvath J, Fliegauf M, Loges NT, Schweitzer-Krantz S, Moebus R, Weiler P, Kispert A, Superti-Furga A, Wevers RA, Omran H: Mutations in ACY1, the gene encoding aminoacylase 1, cause a novel inborn error of metabolism. Am J Hum Genet. 2006 Mar;78(3):401-9. Epub 2006 Jan 18. [PubMed:16465618 ]
  2. Ball RO, Courtney-Martin G, Pencharz PB: The in vivo sparing of methionine by cysteine in sulfur amino acid requirements in animal models and adult humans. J Nutr. 2006 Jun;136(6 Suppl):1682S-1693S. [PubMed:16702340 ]
  3. van de Poll MC, Dejong CH, Soeters PB: Adequate range for sulfur-containing amino acids and biomarkers for their excess: lessons from enteral and parenteral nutrition. J Nutr. 2006 Jun;136(6 Suppl):1694S-1700S. [PubMed:16702341 ]
  4. Garlick PJ: Toxicity of methionine in humans. J Nutr. 2006 Jun;136(6 Suppl):1722S-1725S. [PubMed:16702346 ]
  5. Elshenawy S, Pinney SE, Stuart T, Doulias PT, Zura G, Parry S, Elovitz MA, Bennett MJ, Bansal A, Strauss JF 3rd, Ischiropoulos H, Simmons RA: The Metabolomic Signature of the Placenta in Spontaneous Preterm Birth. Int J Mol Sci. 2020 Feb 4;21(3). pii: ijms21031043. doi: 10.3390/ijms21031043. [PubMed:32033212 ]
  6. Oehlsen ME, Hegmans A, Qu Y, Farrell N: Effects of geometric isomerism in dinuclear antitumor platinum complexes on their interactions with N-acetyl-L-methionine. J Biol Inorg Chem. 2005 Aug;10(5):433-42. doi: 10.1007/s00775-005-0009-1. Epub 2005 Sep 23. [PubMed:16091934 ]
  7. Van Damme P, Hole K, Pimenta-Marques A, Helsens K, Vandekerckhove J, Martinho RG, Gevaert K, Arnesen T: NatF contributes to an evolutionary shift in protein N-terminal acetylation and is important for normal chromosome segregation. PLoS Genet. 2011 Jul;7(7):e1002169. doi: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1002169. Epub 2011 Jul 7. [PubMed:21750686 ]
  8. Ree R, Varland S, Arnesen T: Spotlight on protein N-terminal acetylation. Exp Mol Med. 2018 Jul 27;50(7):1-13. doi: 10.1038/s12276-018-0116-z. [PubMed:30054468 ]
  9. Tanaka H, Sirich TL, Plummer NS, Weaver DS, Meyer TW: An Enlarged Profile of Uremic Solutes. PLoS One. 2015 Aug 28;10(8):e0135657. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0135657. eCollection 2015. [PubMed:26317986 ]
  10. Toyohara T, Akiyama Y, Suzuki T, Takeuchi Y, Mishima E, Tanemoto M, Momose A, Toki N, Sato H, Nakayama M, Hozawa A, Tsuji I, Ito S, Soga T, Abe T: Metabolomic profiling of uremic solutes in CKD patients. Hypertens Res. 2010 Sep;33(9):944-52. doi: 10.1038/hr.2010.113. Epub 2010 Jul 8. [PubMed:20613759 ]
  11. Vanholder R, Baurmeister U, Brunet P, Cohen G, Glorieux G, Jankowski J: A bench to bedside view of uremic toxins. J Am Soc Nephrol. 2008 May;19(5):863-70. doi: 10.1681/ASN.2007121377. Epub 2008 Feb 20. [PubMed:18287557 ]